RDS encryption vs TDE

If you’re starting to use cloud services, the number of options available can be confusing. Particularly when they may seem to do the same thing.

If you’re on AWS, and you want to create a SQL Server instance on RDS (Relational Database Service), then you potentially have a couple of different options for enabling encryption at rest.

If you’re deploying an Enterprise Edition SQL Server instance then you could use TDE (Transparent Database Encryption), the technology most of us in the SQL Server world already have some awareness of.

RDS also has its own at-rest encryption though, so what’s the difference?

The answer is that (at least in terms of what they protect) they are pretty much equivalent. RDS encryption can be used with whichever database platform you choose to use – Aurora, MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Oracle or SQL Server. As many people want this functionality it made sense for Amazon to provide it.

Only Oracle and SQL Server have their own built-in equivalent – TDE – so in these cases you have a choice of which want you want to use. You may prefer to use the one you are familiar with from your on-premise deployments, or you may prefer to go with the RDS one.

A key difference is going to be database backups. RDS handles backups for you, and of course these backups will be encrypted whichever option you choose. However, you would be wise to also take your own set of backups which you store outside the RDS instance. With RDS encryption these backups would not be encrypted, however with TDE they would be.

Even this though is not a killer point, with SQL Server (from 2014 onward) you have backup encryption, so even if you were using RDS, you could use this to make sure that externally stored backups were also encrypted.

A big reason you might want to use the RS encryption is price. TDE is only available on SQL Server Enterprise Edition, whereas you can use RDS encryption on Standard Edition also.

The difference in cost for SQL Server Standard vs Enterprise licences is significant. Last time I checked the standard price was around $2,000 dollars per CPU core for Standard, but $7,000 with Enterprise.

The price difference in RDS is also large. If I look at a “db.m4.xlarge” instance which is 4 virtual CPUs and 16GB RAM, then the price quoted is roughly  $750 dollars a month for SQL Server Standard Edition, $1,650 for Enterprise.

Of course, there are differences between each technology in terms of how you set it up and manage it, how and where the keys are stored etc. But if you’re confronted with the choice, then mostly, you can just pick the one you prefer, it doesn’t really matter.

What does matter is that if you prefer not to pay for Enterprise Edition, then you still have the option of at-rest encryption. Which is great news.

 

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